Brewhouse Operations
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Copper Brewing Kettels
Mashing
Genetic Engineering
Filtration of Mash
Hops
Water

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The brewhouse consists of brewery buildings housing machinery and equipment for the production of wort. Processes taking place here include milling of the kiln dried malt (D), mashing (E), filtration (F) and wort boiling (G).

D) The malt is milled into fine grits to ensure good access of water to grain particles in the subsequent phase of beer production. Milling energy is a good indication of malt quality, where homogeneously modified malt has a lower milling energy. Malt may be supplemented with solid adjunct, i.e. a sugar source such as flaked or roasted barley, in order to impart specific flavour or colour characteristics to the finished beer.

E) Milled malt is mixed thoroughly with two to four volumes of water to yield mash, and subjected to a process - denoted mashing - that fundamentally is an extension of malting with the action of various enzymes. Boiled, gelatinized starch from maize or rice grains may be supplemented as adjunct during mashing to achieve a higher content of fermentable sugars.

F) At the end of the mashing operation, soluble substances and residual solid particles are separated by filtration into sweet wort and spent grains, respectively. Factors influencing mash filtration are complex and range from physical effects, such as particle size, to high viscosity caused by gum and protein aggregates.

G) In the next process in the brewhouse, hops are added to the wort as a source of bitter substances, which are solubilized during wort boiling (> 1 h) and give beer its characteristic taste and aroma. In addition, wort boiling serves to denature enzymes and other proteins, sterilizes the wort, and yields a darker liquid which is an excellent medium for subsequent fermentation with brewers yeast.

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This page was last updated 06/08/99. Send comments to